• Practical Pistol

    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:47 PM

    S 1. Unsafe gun handling will result in immediate
    disqualification from the entire match.
    Examples (but not limited to):
    A. Endangering any person, including yourself.
    B. Pointing muzzle beyond designated ?Muzzle Safe Points?.
    A 180 degree rule does NOT exist and will NOT be grounds for DQ.
    C. Handling a loaded firearm except while on the firing line.
    Unloaded firearms may be handled only in designated ?safe
    areas?.
    Note: There are only three instances in which the
    gun may be removed from the holster:

    1. While engaging targets in a CoF under the
    supervision of a safety officer.
    2. With verbal instruction from an SO.
    3. When in a designated ?safe area?.

    D. Dropping a loaded firearm. If a contestant drops a loaded
    firearm during a stage or string of fire, the SO will immediately yell ?STOP?. It will then be the task of the SO to pick up/recover the dropped firearm and render it safe and unloaded before returning it to the contestant. The contestant will be disqualified from the entire event as well as any side events occurring with the match.
    E. Dangerous or repeated "finger in trigger guard" violations
    during loading, unloading, reloading, drawing, holstering,
    remedial action.
    F. A premature shot: in the holster; striking behind (up range
    of) the firing line; into the ground downrange closer to the
    firing line than two yards; or over a berm.
    S 2. Dropping an unloaded firearm may incur penalties at the
    discretion of the SO and/or MD.
    S 3. Pistols will be loaded only when directed by a safety
    officer. (See note at end of Safety Rules regarding Hot and
    Cold ranges.)
    S 4. Shock resistant eye protection and ear protection are
    required to be used by ANYONE at the range facility.
    S 5. After completing any CoF, the shooter must unload, show clear and re-holster before turning up-range or leaving the firing line. (See note at end of Safety Rules regarding Hot and Cold ranges.)
    S 6. Pistols used in competition will be serviceable and safe.
    The MD will require a competitor to withdraw any pistol
    observed to be unserviceable or unsafe. In the event that a
    pistol cannot be loaded or unloaded due to a broken or failed mechanism, the shooter must notify the SO, who will take such action he thinks safest.
    S 7. Fingers must be outside the trigger guard during loading,unloading, drawing, re-holstering, while moving (unless engaging targets) or during remedial action.
    A. Failure to comply will result in a three (3)
    second procedural error penalty.
    B. Multiple violations of this rule could result in
    additional penalties or disqualification from the
    entire match at the discretion of the MD.

    S 8. The normal condition of pistols not actually engaged is
    holstered and unloaded, with hammer down and magazine
    removed. Loaded firearms may only be handled in the safe
    area when supervised by the MD or a SO. Magazines and
    speedloaders may be reloaded while off the firing line, but the contestant?s firearm may be loaded or unloaded only under the direction of the SO. (See note at end of Safety Rules regarding Hot and Cold ranges.)
    S 9. All CoF will be started with the pistol holstered and safe,hands clear of equipment as directed by the SO unless other positions for the pistol are stipulated (table top, drawer, pack,purse, or in the firing hand).
    NOTE: The question of Hot and Cold ranges at the local club
    level is subject to individual club policy. This issue is the sole responsibility of local clubs and is beyond IDPA control. Matches sanctioned by IDPA are required to have Cold ranges. A cold range is defined as a range where all shooters must be unloaded unless under the supervision of a SO. Unless your club has a policy of a HOT range, all firearms should be unloaded except
    when on the firing line.
    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:47 PM

    C 1. Competitors will not attempt to circumvent or
    compromise the spirit or rationale of any stage either by the
    use of inappropriate devices, equipment or techniques. This is the Failure To Do Right rule.

    C 2. Competitors will refrain from unsportsmanlike conduct,
    unfair actions, or the use of illegal equipment, which, in the
    opinion of the match director, tends to make a travesty of
    IDPA.

    C 3. There are only three (3) IDPA approved reloads and they normally begin and end behind cover (reload specifications are found in Appendix TWO Approved IDPA Reloads):

    A. Tactical Reload.
    B. Reload with Retention.
    C. Slide Lock Reload (Emergency Reload).

    All reloads begin with the shooter?s first action to initiate thereload (ejection of the magazine, drawing a spare magazine,etc.) and end when the weapon is fully charged and ready to fire (magazine fully locked into the weapon and the slide fully forward or cylinder closed). Reloads can only be initiated while behind cover.

    C 4. Individual rehearsals of a CoF are not permitted.

    C 5. Airgunning and/or sight pictures are not permitted. (See glossary for definitions.)

    C 6. Competitors will use all available cover.

    C 7. The competitor?s physical position may not be changed
    before the firing signal once the shooter?s ready position is
    assumed and the ?Stand-By? command has been given, unless specified by the CoF.
    C 8. There will be no shots fired before the firing signal.

    C 9. Ties shall be broken in a manner decided upon by the
    match director conducting the contest, however, this shall
    always be done by shooting, not by chance.

    C 10. It shall be the responsibility of each shooter to keep
    account of his score along with the scorekeeper. IF there is anerror in the scorekeeper?s final tally, it shall be the responsibility of the shooter to protest the final results within one hour of the posting of the final scores. Failure to file a protest with the MD prior to the above time nullifies any claims made thereafter.

    All scoring/officiating protests must be made to the MD. The
    decision of the MD will be final as long as his decision is in
    accordance with the rules as set forth in the most current issueof the official rulebook.

    C 11. No shooter can re-shoot a stage or string for gun or
    ?mental? malfunctions except when shooting the ?Classifier?
    10 match for classification purposes. If the classifier is part of a scored match, no re-shoots are permitted. Re-shoots are allowed for stage equipment malfunctions or SO interference with the shooter.

    C 12. In any single contest, a shooter must use the same pistol in all stages of the contest. If the pistol he started with becomes unserviceable during the contest, he may use another pistol of the same type, action, and caliber. Such a shooter may resume the contest at the next scheduled ?start signal?, but previous stages may not be re-shot.

    C 13. No shooter shall wear or use two pistols unless dictated by the specific course of fire at hand.

    C 14. Affiliated clubs must use official IDPA cardboard
    targets for all IDPA matches.

    C 15. Pistols must start from the mechanical condition of
    readiness appropriate to their design and be loaded to specified capacity (To be determined ny the MD at the start of each stage).

    C 16. On cardboard targets, if the outside diameter of the
    shot?s grease ring touches any part of a scoring line
    perforation, it will count for the value of the highest scoring
    zone (radial tears around the bullet hole do not count for
    scoring purposes). Elongated bullet holes in the paper
    exceeding two bullet diameters will not count. This normally
    applies to moving targets fired upon at extreme angles. It can also apply to targets in which a metal target stand has been hit.

    C 17. If a shooter fires more shots than is specified by the CoF in a given Limited Vickers count string, the maximum value for each excess shot shall be subtracted from his score, based on the maximum values of the shots on the target. He will also incur a single procedural penalty regardless of the number of extra shots fired in that string.


    C 18. Range Commands to be used in IDPA shall be: (See
    glossary for definitions.)
    A. Load and Make Ready.
    B. Shooter Ready.
    C. Standby.
    D. Finger.
    E. Muzzle.
    F. Stop.
    G. Cover.
    H. Unload and Show Clear.
    I. Slide Down or Cylinder Closed.
    J. Hammer Down.
    K. Holster.
    L. Range Is Safe.
    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:42 PM

    All equiptment must be deemed fit for:

    A. Practical for self-defense use.
    B. Concealable - All equipment will be so placed
    that, when wearing an open concealment garment
    with your arms extended to your sides and parallel
    to the ground, it can NOT been seen from the front,
    rear or sides.
    C. Must be suitable for and worn in a manner that is
    appropriate for all day continuous wear.

    Pistol Rules

    PERMITTED Modifications (Inclusive list):
    1. Sights may be changed to another conventional notch and post type (see ?sights? in glossary for further information).

    2. Grips may be changed to another style or material that is
    similar to factory configuration.

    3. A slip-on grip sock and/or skateboard tape may be used.

    4. Internal action work may be used to enhance trigger pull as long as safety is maintained (no visible external modifications allowed).

    5. Reliability work may be done to enhance feeding.

    6. Internal accuracy may be worked to include replacement of barrel.

    7. Plastic plugs may be used to fill the opening behind the
    magazine well.

    8. Custom finishes may be applied.

    NOTE: The slide releases and magazine releases that are standard on the Glock 34 and 35 models are allowed.

    EXCLUDED Modifications (NON-Inclusive list):

    1. Externally visible modifications other than grips or sights.

    2. Robar style grip reduction.

    3. Add-on magazine well opening.

    Holsters:

    A. Must be designed for concealed carry and suitable for all
    day continuous wear.

    B. Must be worn on a standard belt of no more than 1 ?? width that must pass through the belt loops on the shooter?s pants.

    C. Must fully cover the trigger of the firearm.

    D. Must carry the firearm in a neutral (vertical) or muzzle rear cant.

    E. Must hold the firearm with enough tension to allow the
    wearer to complete normal daily tasks without fear of losing
    the weapon.

    F. Must be constructed of normal thickness common holster
    making materials (leather, Kydex, plastic, nylon, etc.).

    G. May not position the firearm where the breech face (autos)or rear of the cylinder (revolvers) is below the center of the belt. NO drop loops are permitted.? Holsters for females may position the breech face of a pistol or rear of the cylinder of a revolver up to 1 ?? below the center of the belt.
    NOTE: IWB style holsters are exempt from this criterion.

    H. Must hold the firearm positioned on the body so an object of ??width cannot pass between the shooter?s body and the inside of the firearm when the shooter is standing straight and upright.

    I. Must be positioned on the belt in a location that will keep the center of the trigger pad behind the centerline 4 of the body.

    NOTE: Modification of current holsters and ammunition
    carriers to meet IDPA criteria is acceptable.

    NOT Permitted:

    A. Cross Draw Holsters.

    B. Shoulder Holsters.

    C. Small of the Back Holsters.

    D. Holsters designed and/or marketed as ?competition?
    models.

    E. Muzzle forward or ?on the belt? adjustable cant holsters.
    Those that allow the cant to be adjusted by the shooter while the holster is on the belt are not allowed.

    NOTE: Holsters with an adjustable cant via removal of bolts
    and repositioning of the backpiece are approved if set for
    neutral or muzzle rear cant.

    F. Drop loop holsters.

    G. Positioning of the firearm where the breech face (autos) or the rear of the cylinder (revolvers) is below the center of the belt.
    H. Cutting of the front edge of the holster more that 1?? below the breech face on pistols or 1? below the rear of the cylinder on revolvers.
    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:45 PM

    The scoring system in IDPA is designed to reward accuracy over pure speed. Vickers Count converts everything to a time score and the fastest time wins. The main things to remember when scoring Vickers Count are that everything is based on time and that you are working with the POINTS DOWN (PD) from the possible, NOT the points scored on the target. Always award any question on scoring to the contestant. If you have to look at the target very
    closely to determine if a shot has broken a higher scoring line, you will automatically award the higher value to the contestant. At NOtime will IDPA SOs use scoring plugs or overlays. When in doubt of a scoring call, always award the higher value to the shooter.

    This also applies to doubles. This does not automatically mean that every miss is a double. Additionally, a tear is not used to givea shooter a better score. If you can tell the actual area of the bullethole and it does not reach the next highest scoring ring, the shooter gets the lower score even if the tear reaches the next highest scoring ring.

    A. Vickers Count.
    (For use when shooting speed shoots & scenarios)
    Vickers Count scoring is based on assessing the shooter a ?Time? penalty for every point the shooter drops from the total ?Possible?point score (points down). To score Vickers Count, simply take the time it took to complete the string of fire (raw time) and ADD one-half (.50) of a second for each point down. Add any applicable penalties and total to get the Final Score. In Vickers Count scoring, as many shots as desired may be fired, but only the
    best hits as specified by the course description will be scored.

    For Example: If two (2) hits per target are specified in the course description and three (3) shots are fired, ONLY the two (2) highest scoring hits will count for score.

    In certain course designs, the course description may specify that a certain number of shots may be required on specific areas of the target, i.e. two (2) shots to the body and one (1) shot to the head.

    Shots that are specified for the body, but where the shooter actually
    shoots the head are to be counted as -0. However, shots that are specified for the head that are shot below the neck line are to be counted as misses (-5 for each miss).

    The rationale is that the head box is a smaller target than the body and therefore is a more difficult target. Shooting all shots to the head to circumvent sight alignment transition may be considered a procedural and incur the
    penalty. CoF designers and MDs should be aware of this
    possibility and decide beforehand how to handle it. Some course designers will specify head shots in order to simulate the threat target as wearing body armor.

    Easy way to score Vickers Count:
    1. Write down the raw time from the timer.
    2. Count the total number of misses.
    3. Multiply the number of misses by five (5) points down.
    4. Add the number of points down for the remaining shots to
    the number of misses.
    5. Write down the total points down and multiply by half (.5)second.
    6. Write down applicable penalties, for instance; add three (3)seconds for any procedural penalty.
    7. Add the raw time to the converted points down and
    applicable penalties for a final score.
    8. In this way, everything has been converted to time so that the lowest (fastest) time wins.

    B. Limited Vickers Count.
    (For use when shooting standard exercises or when targets will be engaged multiple times before scoring)

    Same as Vickers Count described above EXCEPT the number of shots you can fire on any string is limited to the number specified in the course description. Any extra shots will incur a procedural penalty of three (3) seconds per string and one of your highest scoring hits will be deducted from your point score for each extra shot fired. Limited Vickers scoring is used to allow multiple strings to be fired without having to score the targets after each string of fire, thus making the stage run quicker.

    Limited Vickers
    should ONLY be used to score Standard Exercises courses and is not suitable for Scenario stages.

    C. Did Not Finish (DNF).
    If a contestant cannot finish a stage due to a broken firearm, his score will be determined by whichever of the following methods will result in the best score:

    1. All required shots that were not fired will be scored for
    points down and failure to neutralize; this time penalty will be added to their total time up to the point where the firearm broke.
    2. The minimum number of shots required for the stage will be multiplied by three (3) seconds for a stage score.

    A competitor that chooses not to shoot a stage will be given no score and a DNF for the entire match.

    D. Hard Cover / Soft Cover.
    Any shot that puts a full diameter hole in ?hard? cover and
    continues on to penetrate the target will be considered to have missed the target (whether the target is a threat or a non-threat).
    There is no penalty for hitting ?hard? cover other than the miss.
    IDPA recommends that clubs/course designers standardize on BLACK for ?hard? cover simulation. Stage props are commonly used to represent ?hard? cover or impenetrable objects such as walls, cars, barricades and furniture such as desks and file cabinets.
    Shots that penetrate ?soft? cover will be scored as HITS. We recommend that clubs/course designers standardize on WHITE for ?Soft? cover simulation, or use props such as windows, curtains,shrubs, etc.

    E. Threat / Non-Threat Designation.
    Threat targets may be designated by the painting of a gun or clipping the cutout of a gun on the target. This target designation is not mandatory, but is highly recommended. In no case should a gun and an open hand be positioned on the same target. Targets should be clearly designated as threat or non-threat.
    Non-threat targets MUST be designated by the painting of an open hand or hands on the target or, in the case of a target with a shirt on it, clipping a cutout of an open hand or hands.
    On a shoot through of a non-threat target that also strikes a threat target, the contestant will get the penalty for the non-threat target hit AND will get credit for the scored hit on the threat target. The reverse also applies when a round on a threat target penetrates a
    non-threat behind it. Hence the rule of thumb: all shoot throughs count (except on hard cover).
    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:46 PM

    Tactical Reload (Tac-Load) is recharging the gun during a lull in the action by:

    A. Drawing a spare magazine prior to the ejection of the partial magazine from the gun.

    B. Dropping the partial magazine from the gun.

    C. Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.

    D. Stowing the partial magazine properly (See ?proper
    magazine retention? in the glossary).

    NOTE: Should the CoF call for a Tac-Load and the magazine is empty while a round remains in the chamber, the empty magazine must be retained.

    Reload with Retention (RWR)

    Reload with Retention (RWR) is recharging the gun during a
    lull in the action by:

    A. Dropping the partial magazine from the gun.

    B. Stowing the partial magazine properly (See ?proper
    magazine retention? in the glossary).

    C. Drawing a spare magazine.

    D. Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.

    NOTE: Should the CoF call for a Reload with Retention and the magazine is empty while a round remains in the chamber, the empty magazine must be retained.

    Slide-Lock (Emergency) Reload

    Slide-Lock (Emergency) Reload is recharging the gun when it
    is completely empty by:
    A. Dropping the empty magazine.

    B. Drawing a spare magazine.

    C. Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.

    D. Racking the slide or hitting the slide release button.

    NOTE: The slide does not lock back on some guns. In that case,the shooter will have to rack the slide. This is not grounds for a procedural penalty.

    NOTE: Reloads may only begin when the shooter is fully behind cover and will be deemed completed when the fresh magazine is seated and the slide is fully forward or the cylinder is closed.
    Intentional ?round dumping? to gain a competitive advantage will result in a twenty (20) second FTDR penalty. A good example is firing extra rounds from a position in the open so you will be at
    slide lock and thus reload at a more advantageous time. Courses should be designed with specific reload points behind cover in mind. Once behind cover, a competitor may move behind cover while reloading. If a competitor shoots to slide lock with targets still remaining to be engaged from a specific firing point, thecompetitor does NOT have to duck behind cover while reloading, if you are using cover adequately while firing it will also be adequate cover while reloading. Keeping an eye on your threat zone while reloading is a sound tactic in the real world.For IDPA purposes, contestants may replace the magazine in their
    pistol with a fully loaded one while the pistol remains in the holsteras long as they are facing down range and the range is clear. It ishighly recommended that contestants become comfortable with performing either a Tactical Reload or a Reload with Retention between strings of fire as they re-charge their pistols.

    Cover 

    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:46 PM

    More than 50% of the shooter?s upper torso must be behind cover while engaging threat targets and/or reloading. For low cover, one knee must be on the ground and for vertical cover such as a wall/barricade, 100% of the shooter?s legs and feet must be behind cover.

    A general rule of thumb is that the shooter will have to lean out of cover more for each target he engages (slicing the pie). The distance between the threat targets will determine how much more the shooter must poke out in order to engage the targets. A shooter who engages more than one target from the same position has not
    been using cover properly.

    When possible, having the scorekeeper stand directly behind the competitor (after the gun is drawn) will assist the SO in determining if 50% exposure was maintained. However, in most instances, the safety officer can position himself so both the shooter?s gun and relationship to the targets can both be observed.

    Safety Officers who observe a shooter not using cover properly should shout the command ?COVER?. The shooter should immediately correct his use of cover. IDPA understands many shooters are often too fast in engaging targets for the SO to be able to warn the shooter in time. Therefore, if the Safety Officer did not have the time or opportunity to yell ?COVER? before the shooter engaged targets without using cover properly, the shooter
    still earns a procedural error.All reloads must be executed from cover (if cover is available) and must be completed before leaving cover. A shooter is deemed loaded and may move from a position of cover ONLY when the
    fresh magazine is FULLY SEATED and the slide is fully forward or revolver cylinder is closed. Shooters may not move from one position of cover to another with an empty gun. Reloads must be completed from cover, however this does not mean that a shooter must duck back completely behind cover to reload before reengaging targets from a stationary firing point.
    The contestant may keep his eyes on his next ?opponent? as long as he follows thedefinition of cover and does not expose too much of his body to the next threat target.
    by Published on 3rd June 2012 03:44 PM

    Airgunning: The act of going through the motions of firing the CoF with a hand or pointed finger without a firearm in hand.


    Beavertail: Commonly, a grip safety that protects the hand from being hit by the hammer of a gun.


    Bianchi Style Barricade: A barricade wall the dimensions of
    which are 24? wide by 6' tall. The shooting box is 24? wide and does not necessarily have a back to it.


    Concealment: Using a garment to conceal the gun, holster and ammunition container carriers.


    CoF: Course of Fire.


    Cold Range: A range that does NOT allow loaded firearms in the holster or to be handled except while on the firing line and under the supervision of a SO.


    Cover: 1) More than 50% of the shooter?s upper torso must be behind cover while engaging threat targets and/or reloading. For low cover, one knee must be on the ground and for vertical cover such as a wall/barricade, 100% of the shooter?s legs and feet must be behind cover.


    All reloads must be executed from cover (if cover is available) and must be completed before leaving cover. A shooter is deemed loaded and may move from a position of cover ONLY when the fresh magazine is FULLY SEATED and the slide is fully forward or revolver cylinder is closed.


    Shooters may not move from one position of cover to another with an empty gun. Reloads must be completed from cover, however this does not mean that a shooter
    must duck back completely behind cover to reload before
    reengaging targets from a stationary firing point. The contestant may keep his eyes on his next ?opponent? as long as he follows the definition of cover and does not expose too much of his body to the next threat target.


    2) See ?Range Commands?.
    Chronograph: An instrument for measuring the time of flight of projectiles and used for determining power floors.


    Cylinder Closed: See ?Range Commands?.


    Elongated Bullet Hole: An oval shaped bullet hole caused by
    shooting into the target at an extreme angle. Elongated bullet holes that are larger than twice the diameter of the bullet score as a miss on turning targets.


    Extended Magazine Release: A slightly longer than standard
    magazine release that does not protrude from the frame more than .2 inches.


    Extended Slide Release: A slide stop/release that is wider or
    longer than industry standard for the model.


    Finger: See ?Range Commands?.


    Freestyle: The shooter?s option to shoot with either hand or with both hands holding the gun.


    Hammer Down: See ?Range Commands?.


    Hot Range: A range that allows loaded guns in the holster even when not on the firing line. No firearms are to be handled except under the supervision of a SO or in the Safe area.


    Load and Make Ready: See ?Range Commands?.


    Loaded Firearm: A firearm containing any ammunition whether the chamber is loaded or not.


    Match: A competition comprised of courses of fire that a
    competitor completes, normally held on a monthly basis by clubs approved by IDPA.


    MD: Match Director. See Appendix FIVE-IDPA Organization-D.


    Muzzle: See ?Range Commands?.


    Muzzle Safe Point: A position on a CoF, beyond which, it is not safe to aim the muzzle of a gun. Due to the nature of IDPA courses of fire and the fact that many ranges have U shaped backstops, a standard 180-degree line is often impractical and/or unnecessary. There will be at least two (2) muzzle safe points on any given stage. Pointing of the competitor?s muzzle beyond 78 predetermined muzzle safe points will result in immediate disqualification. The muzzle of a shooter?s handgun MUST NEVER be pointed in an unsafe direction. The pointing of a firearm in any direction that would cause injury to another person is deemed unsafe. Competitors should ALWAYS be conscious of their muzzle direction.
    NOTE: Safety officers/spectators should NEVER stand directly
    behind the holstered handgun during the start command or during
    re-holstering of the handgun.


    Oversize Magazine Release: Any magazine release in which the diameter is greater than the factory standard magazine release.


    Proper Magazine Retention: A place for a partially loaded
    magazine to be stowed before firing the first shot after a reload.
    These places include: pants pocket; vest pocket; jacket pocket;waistband; magazine pouch. The use of specially designed pockets, shirt pockets, upper vest pockets, hands or teeth is NOT permitted.


    Radial Tear: A tear in the cardboard or paper that occurs
    perpendicular to the grease ring of the bullet and is not used for scoring purposes.




    Range Commands:
    Load and Make Ready: Command given to the shooter to load gun to either CoF specification or division capacity and reholster.


    Shooter Ready: Question asked by SO to make sure the shooter is ready to engage the CoF.


    Standby: Command given to the shooter to freeze in the start position before the audible start signal.


    Finger: Alert given to shooter to remove his finger from the trigger guard.


    Muzzle: Alert given to shooter to maintain muzzle control within the muzzle safe points. Safety Officers may need to physically push the shooter?s arms to get the muzzle downrange if they do not immediately move at the command.


    Stop: Alert given to the shooter to stop all shooting and movement.


    Cover: Alert given to the shooter for using improper cover.
    Unload and Show Clear: Command given to the shooter to unload his weapon and show the SO a clear chamber or cylinder.


    Slide Down or Cylinder Closed: Command given to the shooter to lower the slide or close the cylinder of an empty weapon.


    Hammer Down: Command given to shooter to dry fire into the berm to show a clear weapon.


    Holster: Command given to the shooter to put the weapon back in the holster.
    Range is Safe: Command stating that the shooter has holstered his weapon and it is safe to proceed downrange.
    Reload: A method of recharging the gun. There are three (3) types of reloads allowed in IDPA. See ?Reload, Slide Lock?, ?Reload,Tactical (Tac-Load)? and ?Reload with Retention? for further details. A shooter is deemed loaded and may move from a position of cover ONLY when the fresh magazine is FULLY-SEATED and the slide is closed or revolver cylinder is closed.


    Reload, Speed or Slide Down: Recharging the gun when there is a round in the chamber by:
    Dropping the partial magazine on the ground.
    Drawing a spare magazine.
    Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.
    Leaving the partial or empty magazine behind.
    NOTE: There is NO provision for the speed reload in IDPA
    competition.


    Reload, Slide Lock: Recharging the gun when it is completely
    empty by:
    Dropping the empty magazine.
    Drawing a spare magazine.
    Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.
    Racking the slide or hitting the slide release button.
    NOTE: The slide does not lock back on some guns. In that case,the shooter will have to rack the slide. This is not grounds for a procedural penalty .


    Reload, Tactical (Tac-Load): Recharging the gun during a lull in the action by:
    Drawing a spare magazine prior to the ejection of the partial
    magazine from the gun.
    Dropping the partial magazine from the gun.
    Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.
    Stowing the partial magazine properly (See ?proper magazine retention.?)
    NOTE: Should the CoF call for a Tac-Load and the magazine is empty while a round remains in the chamber, the empty magazine must be retained.


    Reload with Retention: Recharging the gun during a lull in the action by:
    Dropping the partial magazine from the gun, Stowing the
    partial magazine properly (See ?proper magazine retention.?)
    Drawing a spare magazine.
    Inserting the spare magazine into the gun.
    NOTE: Should the CoF call for a Reload with Retention and the magazine is empty while a round remains in the chamber, the empty magazine must be retained.


    Revolver Neutral: A descriptive term for a CoF which does not
    call for revolver shooters to do impossible things. This does NOT mean that every CoF should require six (6) rounds or less. This does mean that, if a CoF requires a tactical reload, the tactical reload will be called for before six (6) rounds have been expended.
    You cannot ask a person with an empty gun to retain unexpended
    rounds. Think of revolvers when designating cover, reloads and stage requirements.


    Safe Area: A designated area to handle UNLOADED guns. NO
    AMMUNITION can be handled in a safe area.
    Sanctioned Match: A major match approved by the AC or HQ.
    Sanctioned matches are listed in each issue of the Tactical Journal and are listed on the IDPA website under ?Upcoming Major Matches?.
    Scenario stage: CoF designed to simulate a real life encounter.


    Shooter Ready: See ?Range Commands?.


    Sight Picture: The act of drawing a loaded or unloaded firearm and aiming it down range before the start signal to begin a CoF; a procedural penalty will be incurred for each infraction.


    Sights: Only conventional notch and post type sights are permitted for IDPA competition. Sights may include tritium inserts, fiber optic inserts, white dots, etc. Examples of conventional notch and post type sights:


    Slide, lightening: Removal of portions of the slide to gain a
    competitive advantage.


    Slide Down: See ?Range Commands?.


    Speed shoot: An up-close and personal CoF or string that
    normally will have no more than six (6) rounds required and be no more than seven (7) yards firing distance.


    SO: Safety Officer. See Appendix FIVE-IDPA Organization-B
    Safety Officer.


    Stage: See ?CoF?.


    Standby: See ?Range Commands?.


    Standard Exercises: Stages that do not depict possible real life encounters but do test skills that could be needed in a real life encounter. The IDPA Classifier is a standard exercise.


    Stippling: Texturing. Similar to checkering, but normally used on polymer frame guns. Used basically to create a more secure grip.


    Stop: See ?Range Commands?.


    String: Section of a CoF initiated by a start signal, ending with the last shot fired. There may be more than one string per CoF.


    Strong Hand: The hand the shooter holds the gun in normally while shooting.


    Strong Hand Only: Denotation in a CoF that only the strong hand can be used to control the gun. The weak hand must not touch the gun except when clearing a malfunction.


    Tactical Priority: A method of target engagement. For Tactical Priority, targets are engaged by order of threat. If all targets are visible, targets are engaged from near to far, as long as targets are more than two (2) yards from each other. If targets are hidden by a barricade, targets are engaged as they are seen (slicing the pie).


    Tactical Sequence: A method of target engagement. For Tactical Sequence, all targets are engaged with one round each before being engaged again. In the case of three (3) targets requiring two (2)rounds each, all targets would be engaged with one round to each target BEFORE reengaging the targets with another round in any order (1-1-2-1-1).


    TDP: Total Points Down.


    Weak Hand: The hand that the shooter does NOT normally shoot with.


    Unload and Show Clear: See ?Range Commands?.


    Weak Hand Only: Denotation in a CoF that only the weak hand can be used to control the gun. The strong hand must not touch the gun except when clearing a malfunction.

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